Ramakrishna Kommagani, PhD

Assistant Professor of Ob & Gyn

Phone314-273-1638

Emailkommaganir@wudosis.wustl.edu

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Education

  • BSc, Microbiology: Osmania University, Hyderabad, India (2001)
  • MSc, Microbiology: Osmania University, Hyderabad, India (2003)
  • PhD, Biomedical Sciences: Wright State University, Dayton, OH (2009)
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (2014)

Recognition

Memberships:

Society for Study of Reproduction
Sigma Xi Scientific Society
Endocrine Society
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Research Interests

Review Committees:

Peer reviewer – PLoS One, BOR and Cancer Letters
Amgen Scholars Fellowships Awards
Endocrine Society’s Summer Fellowship

 

Dr. Ramakrishna Kommagani received B.S. and M.S. in Microbiology from Osmania University, India and Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from Wright State University, Ohio. Subsequently, Dr. Kommagani conducted postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Bert O’Malley at Baylor College of Medicine, where he investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Steroid Receptor Coregulator (SRC-2) function in normal endometrial functions.  Dr. Kommagani was then a Research Instructor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular biology at Baylor College of Medicine, where his research focus is on delineating the molecular mechanisms by which coregulators modulate steroid-hormone responses in the female reproductive tract–in particular, uterine biology.

Currently, Dr. Kommagani is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and a faculty member in the Center for Reproductive Health Sciences.

In 2015 Dr. Kommagani received the Early Investigators Award from the Endocrine Society. He has published more than 20 peer-reviewed manuscripts in high impact journals including Cell Metabolism, Cell Research and PLoS Genetics. He is also a receipient of the NIH/NICHD K99/R00 grant to establish his independent research program on two endocrine-related clinical issues that adversely affect a woman’s reproductive health: early implantation failure and endometriosis.